Release Day Book Review: Sunshine by Kim Kelly

Those of you who know me know that I’m a pretty fast reader, but this was one book that made me slow down so that I could savour every line. Kim Kelly always manages to write in such a beautiful way so as to touch you deep inside. I have just finished reading Sunshine for the second time in a month, as I felt I needed to absorb the writing and the story again, I know it will be one of those rare books I come back to over and over. I highlighted so many passages throughout this short novel because Kim Kelly’s words conveyed so much.

img_20190121_065430We meet Jack, Snow and Grace along with Art, these four damaged and lost souls all trying  to rediscover life after physically surviving the war. Sunshine is the place they choose to make their new start, it is the place that draws them together, though Sunshine itself is as much a character in the story as it is a place.

The earth deepened all its colours, all its own pleasure, the reds of the earth redder, the greens of the scrabbly grass greener and spreading across the land like hands seeking hands, and in every puddle stood flowers of a kind she’d never seen before: white globes atop tall, slender stems, their petals unfurling like feathery suns. 

It’s not just Sunshine itself that binds these four people it is their ability to see into each other and realise that they are each connected by the war, by the atrocities they have seen and experienced, by the damage that has been done to them deep inside.

Yes, horror was everywhere, injustice was everywhere, the whole globe over, but, thought Grace, new life is here. New life in this most ancient of lands.

Sunshine has been divided up into lots for the Soldiers Settlement Plan, for returned men. Except for Jack, Jack’s story is one that many aboriginal people suffered through, he returned from fighting a war in the Light Horse in Palestine, but on return that sacrifice is not acknowledged, nor is he entitled to any of the opportunities given white returning soldiers. The unfairness and discriminatory nature of the way Aboriginal people were (and are) treated makes me so angry and heartbroken.

‘Aborigines are controlled by the state,’ her husband explained further and more dreadfully. ‘They don’t get a say in these sorts of things. Or anything, really. They’re told where to live, where to go, what to do.’

Snow is a broken man, he’s barely surviving and is hopeful that Sunshine and his plan to grow citrus trees will help him live again. He’s a loner who doesn’t have much to say to anyone and doesn’t want to be close to anyone again, including his horse, because with relationships comes loss.

And Snow could only reply, ‘Yep,’ for that word comprised approximately half of his spoken vocabulary – the other half consisting of its opposite, Nah.

Grace and Art, what a strange but wonderful couple they are, especially Grace, who has so much joy and hope that it seems to spill from her. They are full of dreams and hopes whilst both trying to survive the fallout from the war.

she should have known he wasn’t recovered. He would never recover. And that was all right. They would live life their way, as it came, and in gratitude that they had lives to be getting on with. She’d go anywhere with him or for him. She’d go to the moon.

This cast of four unlikely people come together and form friendships of different sorts in an unlikely place that might help them find themselves and start them on their journey towards the future.

Perhaps it wasn’t the most ideal time to bring a child into the world– a world too wounded in every way. A crippled world, a mangled world, a world that would never, ever be the same. But looking out across this bloom-strewn field towards the river, this world seemed nothing less than perfect.

I loved this novel, I highly recommend it and wish I could do it justice in my review. These four characters and Sunshine will stay with me for a long time.

 

About the book: A tale of longing, loss and growing love under the bright Australian sun.

It’s 1921 and the Great War has left in its wake untold tragedy, not only in lives lost, but in the guilt of survivors, the deep-set scars of old wounds and the sting of redoubled bigotries.

In the tiny hamlet of Sunshine, on the far-flung desert’s edge, three very different ex-servicemen – Jack Bell, an Aboriginal horseman; Snow McGlynn, a laconic, curmudgeonly farmer; and Art Lovelee, an eccentric engineer – find themselves sharing a finger of farmland along the Darling River, and not much else. That is, until Art’s wife Grace, a battle-hardened nurse, gets to work on them all with her no-nonsense wisdom.

Told with Kim Kelly’s inimitable wit and warmth, Sunshine is a very Australian tale of home, hope and healing, of the power of growing life and love, and discovering that we are each other’s greatest gifts.

 

 

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Book Bingo: Round 4

Another fortnight down, time to cross off another square from the bingo card, this week I’m marking off two squares again.

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First is a book Written by an Australian Male, for this I have chosen Michael Trant’s Ridgeview Station which was a fabulous read.

dav

Ridgeview Station is an unreservedly genuine tale of life on the land, full of family, friendships, hard work, trials, loss, hope and community. The characters in this story are real people, just like us, full of hopes, dreams and faults. They are hard working people who are passionate about the land and about their business. “He’d made the comment that since the house wasn’t at risk and it was just bushland burning, he would allow it. The family, however, were more worried about the bush and the stock than their home, a perspective most outsiders had trouble grasping. ‘House is insured,’ Pete had said simply, when Alexi had asked him at dinner if he was worried about the beautiful old homestead. He waved out to the glow on the horizon. ‘The more bush we lose, the less the sheep have to eat. Can’t insure that, or the sheep.'”

Life on the land, with it’s harsh conditions and uncontrollable weather means that people who choose to run a station or a farm, are continually battling and hoping for the best weather and the best conditions in order to make money and keep their properties. They are passionate people and have to be strong in order to survive the ups and downs that come with living off the land as well as demands from banks who don’t care one iota for weather conditions, only money.

The family, Pete, Kelsie, Jack annd Lisa were everything you would want in a family, especially one who live and work together on a property like Ridgeview. There was so much respect and love between them, and their love for their land and animals was so strong, that I was immediatley drawn into their lives, experiencing everything they were going through and hoping against hope that things would work out. I was holding my breath at times, completely absorbed in their fight to save their land against one of natures cruelest beasts, fire.

I enjoyed getting to know all of the characters, especially the quirky ones like old Kev who’d lived on Ridgeview Station for so many years that it was in his blood. Bull, one of the men who come to help the family out in their time of need, using his heavy machinery to try to save the land from burning, was also another genuine and down-to-earth character who I enjoyed. Alexi, a backpacker and farmhand bought a fresh perspective to the story and allowed explanations of the procedures of life on the land as she learnt to understand how everything worked and ran.

I’m so glad I got to spend time with this family on Ridgeview, and I highly recommend you go and grab yourself a copy of this wonderful Australian tale.

The second square is a Memoir about a non-famous person. For this one I chose Eggshell Skull by Bri Lee

Eggshell Skull is a memoir by a really strong and brave young woman who didn’t realise her strength until she found herself in a situation out of her control. A situation she started the ball rolling on, without realising how long she would be made to wait for justice.dav

Bri starts off her story at the beginning of her law career, in her year as a judges associate. Through doing the judges circuit around Qld she hears many terrible cases of sexual abuse on children and women in particular, but also on men. As she herself is triggered by these people’s stories, we find out that she has been sexually assaulted as a child, and the long term effect this has had on her. From watching and listening to these stories and cases, Bri also gains the strength and realisation that she needs to face her abuse and her abuser in order to get on with her own life in a healthy way.

The statistics on these kinds of cases are staggering, and as Bri carries on, she finds out how many people she knows who have been victims of abuse It’s hard to acknowledge how prevalent this is in our society. We also learn how few people come forward and report the abuse, and when they do, how few of those cases actually get charged and then how few of those go through the legal system to receive any kind of justice.

She starts the legal ball rolling on a journey that will take almost 2 years to come to and end. Through that time we see her struggle, the abuse she inflicts upon herself throughout the story and the many feelings of low self-worth she suffers, just like many people who have been abused. Bri is extremely lucky, she has the support of her family and her partner behind her, as well as Judge, the man she worked for on the circuit who has become a friend.

Bri falls apart often, but she picks herself up again every time and carries on, fighting for justice against her abuser and against the legal system. I can’t say I was shocked by how badly our legal system lets down the victims of crime, but it was extremely eye-opening and heartbreaking to read about those peoples stories as Bri travels on the circuit and as she wonders if she herself will receive justice.

I take my hat off to all the people that do take the step to bring their abuser to justice in such a terribly flawed legal system. The law has changed over the years, but we still aren’t where we need to be. Women are still too often not believed, are called liars or told they are overreacting and that it was their fault it happened. Things need to change, fast. Attitudes need to change.

A highly confronting story by a brave and strong young woman, who by fighting for justice for herself and telling her story, may be a catalyst for others to tell theirs, for them also to be willing to fight and for the stigma of sexual assault to be challenged.

Well, that’s it for another bingo round, I hope everyone who’s joining in has managed to cross off another square this week. See you in a fortnight for the next square.

 

 

 

Book Review: Whispers at Wongan Creek by Juanita Kees

When I heard Juanita Kees had a new book coming out in the Wongan Creek series, I thought I’d better get my act together and read the first book which I bought way back in 2016. Such is my addiction to buying great books, that it often takes me forever to get around to reading some of them.

IMG_20190212_004307This is another book that I really wish I’d read sooner, that being said, I’m extremely glad I’ve finally gotten around to it because it was a really great read and I’m looking forward to reading book 2 Secrets at Wongan Creek and the new release next month, Shadows over Wongan Creek

In a category of rural romantic suspense, this book was full of heart, interesting characters, community, secrets and a couple of unsavoury characters. At the heart of the story are Travis and his niece Casey (who’s absolutely adorable) who have both suffered a great loss and are working hard to prove to the powers that be that they should remain together as a family. Travis is a gorgeous guy (I’d love a Travis of my own) and a great uncle and has a huge heart for the people in the community.

Recently new in town is Heather Penney from social services whose job it is to assess whether Travis is fit to be Casey’s guardian. The sexual tension between the two makes doing Heather’s job and her resolve to remain professional much harder. They both try to resist, knowing crossing the line could be detrimental to Travis’ cause.

Then we have Harry, a fabulously lively character, who is suffering from Alzheimers. Harry is Travis’ neighbour and pretty much part of the family, that being said, Travis has taken on the responsibility of looking out for Harry and helping him out in his day to day tasks and in his bid to try to keep his land. This is a really lovely relationship and really shows us what communities can be like in supporting the people around them. We need more of this kind of support, not just in small towns, but in the city too, where so many people get left to fend for themselves.

All the characters we meet in Wongan creek, except for the Bannisters, are wonderfully diverse and very community spirited.

There are plenty of secrets to be uncovered in Wongan Creek surrounding Travis’ sisters death, Casey’s father and a truly horrible character Zac. Some of these secrets will help heal, some will cause trouble and there’s a great twist thrown in there too.

A highly enjoyable read that I definitely recommend. 4.5⭐⭐⭐⭐

 

About the book: Wongan Creek has a second chance at life, but new possibilities unearth long-buried secrets…

Travis Bailey may as well be Wongan Creek. His family has farmed canola for generations, and he sometimes feels like he holds the community together with his bare, dirt-stained hands. Between caring for the farm, his orphaned niece and his elderly, ailing neighbour, he doesn’t have time for himself. He doesn’t have time to fall in love.

Social worker Heather Penney is living on borrowed time. When her mother died of Motor Neurone Disease, she took the initial blood tests and now nothing is guaranteed, let alone a future with a family and a home and a child. Wongan Creek, and its resident protector, might be getting under her skin, but she can’t afford to get attached.

But even as a new mine revitalises the small town, old secrets threaten resurface, and Travis and Heather find themselves fighting to save the farms and the futures of Wongan Creek’s long-time residents—and possibly their own lives.

Book Review: The Secrets Mothers Keep by Jacquie Underdown

I have read Jacquie’s Brothers of the Vine series, a rural romance series that I thoroughly enjoyed. When I heard she was branching out into something different, I preordered it straight away.

IMG_20190208_193045Each chapter is focused on one of the 5 main female characters, all family members, all drawn together to renovate the family Manor in Tasmania and turn it into a B&B. Each returns to undertake this endeavour for their own reasons, and each has secrets, some more life changing than others.

These characters were all so different, Mary the matriarch of the family has a closed off manner. June, Mary and Grace’s sister has to be my favourite of the sisters. When we meet her, she’s a little bit magical and has a hippie like way about her that completely resonated with me, I hope I’m just like her when I’m older. Grace has recently lost her husband and has discovered a secret he’d been keeping, when we first meet her, she’s a little lost and feels like her life has been a lie. Lily-Rose, Mary’s daughter is an actress and has split from her husband due to an affair and also feels completely lost. Pia, Lily-Rose’s daughter finds out her boyfriend is an asshole and leaves the US to be back with her family.

As you can imagine, once these family members converge on the manor and begin living with each other, secrets are bound to become a little less secret. I did figure out one of the secrets, but there were a couple that completely blindsighted me and one left my jaw hanging open in disbelief.

You get little snippets of Mary and June’s past now and again as chapters throughout the book, and this is how a couple of the secrets are slowly revealed.

Luca, ahhh lovely Luca, what I wouldn’t give for a Luca hmmm. OK, enough of that, you get the idea, he’s gorgeous, both to look at according to Pia and June especially, and as a person. Luca is the builder employed to renovate the manor and turn it into a B&B. The chemistry between Luca and Pia is immediate, though Pia is keeping a secret of her own that may or may not ruin her chances with Luca. Luca provides another plot twist I didn’t see coming.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book of Secrets which was full of turbulent relationships and interesting characters and dilemmas.

4.5⭐⭐⭐⭐

About the book: One Family. Three generations. A common goal to unite them. A lifetime of secrets to divide them. But could uncovering the truth be the only way that this family can finally heal?

Three generations of women find their way back home to Tasmania. They embark on a project together to renovate the family manor and convert it into a bed and breakfast.

After a tumultuous life of pain and betrayal, Mary swore she’d never let anyone hurt her or her family again. But in order to keep her word, she has to guard a secret she swore to keep fifty years earlier.

But with the family now under the one roof, and the past tampered with, the foundations of this secret are shaken.

Mary always believed that hiding the truth was protecting the family, but when all is exposed, she finds that by keeping her secret, she was the one hurting them all.

 

 

 

Book Review: Ridgeview Station by Michael Trant

I’ve had this book sitting on my shelf since it was released in 2017, I really wish it hadn’t taken me so long to read it, because it was a fabulous read, so much so, I’m now sporting a fabulous sunburn from where I completely lost track of time while I was lazing on the beach reading it. Then I continued reading it last night until it just about hit me in the face as I lay in bed. With only 40 pages to go, I tried so hard to keep my eyes open, but alas I had to wait until I woke up this morning to finish it.

fptbtyI met Michael last November at WCFF (West Coast Fiction Festival) and felt terrible that I hadn’t yet gotten around to reading his book. What an absolutely lovely and genuine person he was. This book, though fiction is very much inspired by his life experiences working on a sheep station in the Murchison region of WA. This is his first attempt at writing a novel, and as far as I’m concerned, he nailed it.

davRidgeview Station is an unreservedly genuine tale of life on the land, full of family, friendships, hard work, trials, loss, hope and community. The characters in this story are real people, just like us, full of hopes, dreams and faults. They are hard working people who are passionate about the land and about their business. “He’d made the comment that since the house wasn’t at risk and it was just bushland burning, he would allow it. The family, however, were more worried about the bush and the stock than their home, a perspective most outsiders had trouble grasping. ‘House is insured,’ Pete had said simply, when Alexi had asked him at dinner if he was worried about the beautiful old homestead. He waved out to the glow on the horizon. ‘The more bush we lose, the less the sheep have to eat. Can’t insure that, or the sheep.'”

Life on the land, with it’s harsh conditions and uncontrollable weather means that people who choose to run a station or a farm, are continually battling and hoping for the best weather and the best conditions in order to make money and keep their properties. They are passionate people and have to be strong in order to survive the ups and downs that come with living off the land as well as demands from banks who don’t care one iota for weather conditions, only money.

The family, Pete, Kelsie, Jack annd Lisa were everything you would want in a family, especially one who live and work together on a property like Ridgeview. There was so much respect and love between them, and their love for their land and animals was so strong, that I was immediatley drawn into their lives, experiencing everything they were going through and hoping against hope that things would work out. I was holding my breath at times, completely absorbed in their fight to save their land against one of natures cruelest beasts, fire.

I enjoyed getting to know all of the characters, especially the quirky ones like old Kev who’d lived on Ridgeview Station for so many years that it was in his blood. Bull, one of the men who come to help the family out in their time of need, using his heavy machinery to try to save the land from burning, was also another genuine and down-to-earth character who I enjoyed. Alexi, a backpacker and farmhand bought a fresh perspective to the story and allowed explantions of the procedures of life on the land as she learnt to understand how everything worked and ran.

I’m so glad I got to spend time with this family on Ridgeview, and I highly recommend you go and grab yourself a copy of this wonderful Australian tale.

 

About the book: A vast outback property. An unforgettable season. A family’s fight to save their livelihood. A sweeping tale of love and loss, and the highs and lows of life on the land, from an utterly authentic new voice in rural fiction.
The debut novel by Michael Trant.

Many of Peter and Kelsie Dalton’s friends thought they were crazy when they bought Ridgeview Station. But five years on, their hard work, help from Kelsie’s parents, and record rainfall have them in high spirits as the summer muster approaches.

Realising they’re going to need more help this season, Peter rings around the neighbouring stations to try and find a good worker. After a glowing recommendation, Alexi arrives to give them a hand – and is not at all what they’d expected …
Everything is going smoothly with the muster before disaster strikes and the Dalton’s find themselves battling to save their livestock, their property and their lives.

An entertaining yarn set on a vast outback property peopled with colourful and authentic characters, Ridgeview Station is about love, loss and the spirit of the bush.

About Michael: Michael Trant is a WA country boy just beginning his new life as an author, following a wide range of careers from marine draftsman to farmer, and pastoralist to FIFO pot-washer. Michael is now based in Perth, having grown up on the family farm at Eneabba, before moving to Geraldton then out to Yalgoo. His debut novel Ridgeview Station was inspired by his time on Gabyon Station, and he highly recommends a visit for those curious about life on a sheep station.

When he’s not writing, Michael can be found plucking away at his guitar in attempts to replicate his idol Tommy Emmanuel, or swearing at his beloved Fremantle Dockers. He still travels to Three Springs to drive tractors ‘just to keep my hand in,’ but despite the advent of autosteer machines, refrains from taking the laptop to write, as that would not end well for power poles, fences or trees.’

Michael currently lives in Perth. Ridgeview Station is his first novel.

Dymocks

Booktopia

Amazon AU

 

 

January Romance, Erotica and LGBT reads

I decided since I read a fair few books in these genres, but often don’t blog about them, that I would give them a combined blog for those interested. Some of these have adult themes and some have LGBT themes also.

The Last Duke by Deborah Wilson, this is the fourth book in the Valiant Love Regency Romance Series and I was lucky enough to receive an ARC of each book.

4.5⭐⭐⭐⭐ the last dukeI think this my favourite book in this series, I loved that Valiant got her chance at true love. I really enjoyed Anthony, he was a cheeky bastard with a sad past, I thought he was perfect for Valiant and enjoyed the way he pushed her completely out of her comfort zone. Valiant has always done her best to see her brothers and her friends find the love they deserve, but she doesn’t believe she deserves the same due to her horrible dead husband. Seeing her struggling with her emotions and sexual feelings towards Anthony was deliciously amusing to me and I couldn’t wait for her to realise what she was worth. Deborah Wilson always manages to have you on the edge of your seat just when you think things are all going to work out well. While I knew who the bad guy was, I was still surprised at the extent of his depravity when he was discovered. It was so good to revisit with Valiant’s brothers and their wives and see how they were all going. I highly recommend this whole series.

Rough Trade by Sidney Bell. 

rough trade5⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ This was an incredibly engaging story, I wasn’t sure for the first chapter or 2, but then I was hooked and couldn’t put it down as I was way too invested in Ghost and his plight and finding out what was going to happen. Ghost, what a sweet tortured young man he was, my heart ached for him and what he’d been through, and still he remained strong whilst being emotionally broken and his self esteem fragile. And what to say about Duncan Rook who takes on Ghost and his troubles because his friend and ex police partner asks him to. I fell for Duncan, he was so amazing with Ghost and I loved watching the relationship between them develop into something more than police officer out to do the right thing and prostitute in trouble. This was I felt, such a beautiful romance that developed over the time they worked together, both learning so much about themselves in the process. The action and twists in this book just kept right on coming the whole way and I really had no idea how it was all going to turn out, I was definitely hoping for a HEA for these two main characters. There’s definitely a need for trigger warnings, prostitution, rape, child abuse, they are however handled exceptionally well by the author.

I had no idea it was part of a series and other than now wanting to read the first 2 books and learn more about the secondary characters, I feel it stood well as a standalone.

Valor by Karrie Roman

img_20190130_0808165⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ I loved this story, I knew from the first few pages it was going to be a hot read, straight up the chemistry between the two main characters Alec and Asher was there. When Asher’s nephew is kidnapped he comes running to help and Alec is only too happy to have him around. The path to happiness isn’t smooth though with misunderstandings and drama unfolding throughout. I thought the romance that grew between them was lovely and it was a great feelgood read despite the kidnapping and then the trouble that follows. The sex scenes were hot and you could feel how many people ch they cared about each other. I loved the scenes on the boat with the sharks, it kind of makes me want to experience being in a cage and watching those incredible but scary creatures. I didn’t realise this was part of a series on starting, I think it works well as a standalone novel, but I intend to go back and read the previous books to find out Alec’s coworkers stories.

Surreal Real estate by Jesi Ryan

surreal realestate4⭐⭐⭐⭐ I absolutely enjoyed this feel good romance about a young down on his luck guy Sasha, who camps out in an abandoned house which then turns into one of the luckiest choices he’s made. I loved both Nick and Sasha throughout the story, both continually growing on me as I read. I thought the idea of Sasha being able to feel the houses energy and actually communicate with it was really interesting and different. And Nick was just such a lovely guy, going with the flow of his feelings despite reaching out into the unknown. I read this in one sitting as I just didn’t want to put it down, a perfect feel good read, it was really interesting and different. And Nick was just such a lovely guy, going with the flow of his feelings despite reaching out into the unknown. I read this in one sitting as I just didn’t want to put it down, a perfect feelgood read.

Rough Terrain by Annabeth Albert

rough terrain4 ⭐⭐⭐⭐ I had to reread this as I left it too long between reading and reviewing and I have to say I enjoyed it just as much the second time. I adored Renzo, a Navy SEAL and Canaan, a nursing student and former drummer and thought they worked so well together despite being so different from each other. The chemistry between them was great and I loved how being with each other made them grow and come to new realisations about what it was they truly wanted in their lives, as well as them both being so sweet together. I thought Canaan’s love for his grandfather was really lovely and how if you wanted him then it was a package deal. Canaan’s friends, especially Eric, from his old band, I wasn’t too keen on and was glad Renzo was their for him when he had to deal with them. Both had to struggle with life issues to make their relationship work, especially Renzo and I thought that struggle made it that much more intense. I have enjoyed the whole Out Of Uniform series, but I think this is my favourite.

Her Guilty Secret by Clare Connelly

her guilty secret4 ⭐⭐⭐⭐ I really enjoyed this, what starts out as a full blown case of lust between a professor and his student, turns into so much more. There are a few very hot scenes in the first half when Connor and Olivia are fighting the chemistry that pulls them together despite the illicit nature of the relationship they are about to undertake. That both would willingly give in to something that could destroy their careers says a lot about just how strong that chemistry was. I loved the interaction between these two and kept hoping they could make it work as something more.

The D.I.L.F. by Amy Andrews

The DILF4 ⭐⭐⭐⭐ I really enjoyed this fun and very sexy read. I’d like an Owen for myself thank you very much. The scenes were hot and the growing relationship btween Stef and Owen was really quite romantic. I was definitely hoping they’d work things out, especially Stef’s hangup about being 10 years older then Owen.

 

Willful Depravity by Igrid Hahn

Willful depravity3.5 ⭐⭐⭐ This was an enjoyable erotic take on a regency romance. I enjoyed the way Ashcroft completely loved the way Patience looked, and how he made her feel and believe she was desirable because of her larger size. I thought it was great how her relationship with Ashcroft allowed her to look at herself in a much more positive way and gave her the confidence needed to face the nastiness of the people in her social circle. The relationship between Ashcroft and his father was appalling and I couldn’t understand why no one had put him in his place as society seemed to dislike him and he had such contempt for them all. The sex scenes were hot and very enjoyable, whilst watching Patience come into her own, was very gratifying.

Hurt So Good by Stasia Black

Hurt So Good4 ⭐⭐⭐⭐ This was a very dark read, I’ve had to sit with it for the last week, thinking how to write this up. It was an addictive read, with many dark and depraved events from the past and the present. While I can’t possibly relate to the characters of Miranda or Dylan and their dark fetishes, I was still somehow enthralled in their behaviour and their relationship. Both of these characters were so badly damaged, that I wondered if they stood a chance at helping each other to heal. A dark romance that I found hard to put down at the same time wondering how these characters could do and want what they did. I do love Stasia’s writing and she manages to convey so much, both emotionally and physically. It definitely needs trigger warnings including rape, assault, dark sex games, abuse.

Mated To Team Shadow by Jade Alters

Mated to team shadow4.5⭐⭐⭐⭐ I really really enjoyed this sexy adventure romance. This is my favourite of Jade Alters books so far. I was completely engaged, loved the characters, the guys were all so different and had their own quirks which made laugh at times. Jeanine was a good character, a bit changeable at times, but she obviously had chemistry with the guys. The military/science aspect of using the shifters as guinea pigs was completely believable, there’s always an ulterior motive with people in power. I look forward to hopefully reading more in this series.

 

Monthly reading challenge updates

I thought due to the amount of books I plan on reading this year, that I would write a monthly check-in on what I’ve read and how my different challenges are going.

At the beginning of the year I signed up to Australian Women Writers Challenge to read 40 books. I have so far read 16 books by Australian women, though 5 of those were novellas or shorter stories. I think I’ll need to change my target for AWWC.

january round up

Book Bingo consisting of 30 squares, for this challenge I have crossed off 4 squares so far. See my book bingo posts;

Book set in an exotic location      Novella no more than 150 Words                                   Book with a red cover & Written by an author you’ve never read

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All review books jan 2019

My Goodreads challenge is going great guns with 30/200 books read so far making me 9 books ahead of schedule  which gives me breathing room for any read downturn. If you want to check out any of the reviews of the books I have read, click on the Goodreads challenge link and then on each cover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In The Aussie Author Challenge I have crossed off 3/4 books by Australian women, and 2/4 books by Australian authors I wasn’t familiar with. So 5/12 books crossed off already.

That’s it for January, on to February we go.

 

Happy reading 

Claire Louisa xx